Category Archives: Uncategorized

MORE Horror Humor (The Lost Files)

Hey there AGAIN, horror fans! It seems a few of the photos I had planned to share earlier didn’t upload, so I’m posting for a second time today to bring you more giggles.

funnyhorror8

 

 

funnyhorror12

 

horrorfunny16

 

 

horrorfunny17

You CAN judge a book by its cover – a look at the work of Brett Williams

Hiya, horror freaks! Today I’d like to discuss the horrifying works written by friend and colleague Brett Williams. This is an author who is not afraid to “go there”. Though he writes in more than one genre, his horror books tend to gravitate toward the extreme and taboo, in the same vein as Edward Lee.

bw

I have read three of Brett’s books to date. The first one, From Murky Depths, was a light read with none of the depravity of the latter two, High Octane Damnation and Family Business. I, myself, don’t read much extreme horror. Believe it or not, violence is not really my thing. Lol. Who woulda thought? But despite my sub-genre preferences, I DO recognize a well-written, solid piece of fiction when I see it, and Brett Williams always delivers.

What am I getting at with this preamble? Well, as you can imagine, writing extreme horror containing graphic and sexual content always brings in bad reviews, and I guess I’m tired of seeing it. I’m tired of reading reviews claiming a book is garbage just because the reader picked out the wrong type of book for him or herself. There should be no surprise that Brett’s book Family Business contains rape. The cover image is a mostly naked woman behind bars! Did the reader think this sexualized woman behind bars was starring in a romance role? Doubtful. The truth is, the entire novel is oddly compelling from start to finish whether you want to keep reading or not, and the reader who posted the bad review that inspired this blog was probably just disappointed in himself for staying glued to the whole thing! What a sicko! Hahaha. I joke, I joke.

Anyway, I’m here to shout from a mountain top (or from my couch) that you absolutely CAN – in fact SHOULD – judge a book by its cover before you dig in. If there’s a lot of sexuality and blood, or if it’s named “Lucifer’s Whore” for instance, and you still decide to open up those pages and start reading, you just forfeited your right to leave a terrible review based on graphic content, in this blogger’s opinion.

So… there’s my two cents. Seems obvious. I don’t buy a thong swimsuit and complain it shows too much butt cheek. Use your brains, folks. Buy the books you’re likely to enjoy. In fact, here are some covers for books written by Brett Williams. Please, JUDGE THEM accordingly and then decide… do you want to know what’s inside? (I bet you do NOW. Lol.) 🙂

bw-1bw-2bw-3bw-4bw-5

To find out more about this author, please visit: http://brettwilliamsfiction.com

DAY SEVEN of The Dirty Dozen, 12 Days of X-mas: Long Weekend, a movie review by Dene Bebbington

On the seventh day of Christmas,

my true love gave to me…

seven swans a-swimming…

Oh, wait, it seems the swans were swimming in radioactive sludge and they all sprouted second heads and pecked each other to death. Shame, shame. I guess we’ll move forward with our holiday celebration anyhow. How about a movie review?

 

NATURE’S REVENGE

A review of Long Weekend by Dene Bebbington

Arguably the apotheosis of nature turning on people films is Hitchcock’s The Birds. There’s no shortage of gory films in which people get torn up and eaten by various creatures, whether real or mutant. Snakes, sharks, piranha fish and crocodiles rather than people are often the villains in extensions of the slasher genre. When done well they may involve suspense as well as a succession of kills. A more intelligent and sinister approach was taken in the little known 1978 Australian classic Long Weekend, directed by Colin Eggleston.

Warning, spoilers ahead!

long weekend 3

Peter (John Hargreaves) and Marcia (Briony Behets) are a couple going through a bad patch in their marriage and barely on speaking terms. The reason for this isn’t revealed until later, adding to the slow burn of tension. The friction between them is made worse by Peter taking them away (along with their dog, Cricket) for a long weekend to camp at an isolated beach, whereas Marcia wants to stay in a luxurious hotel.

At the beginning of the film there’s a suggestion of something untoward when Marcia is in the house and has the TV on in the background. She takes little notice of a news item about cockatoos attacking people.

Their journey is marked by bickering and a hint at the reason for their estrangement. Peter throws a cigarette from the window, then we’re shown it setting light to foliage at the side of the road. From here on there are many ways in which the couple are thoughtless and ruthless to nature, and blatantly when Peter runs over a kangaroo due to being distracted. Curiously, Peter’s thoughtlessness is sometimes counterpointed by concern. He’s upset at killing the kangaroo, and later berates Marcia for smashing an eagle egg.

Though the story is focused around this couple, they aren’t the sole victims of nature’s fightback. Some way down the beach a camper van has driven into the sea, and the occupants’ camp is empty except for their snarling dog.

The fickle personalities and ambivalent relationship of Peter and Marcia, the moody and primal atmosphere, haunting animal cries and unexplained way a dead dugong moves up the beach all add to the ominous sense that the couple won’t make it home. You suspect that when they try to leave the birds and animals will try to stop them. They’ve violated nature too much and are going to be punished.

Yes, the denouement is not surprising, but is still shocking and effectively done. Away from the comforts of home and the city, with hostile creatures determined to take their revenge, Peter and Marcia learn the literal meaning of the saying “Nature, red in tooth and claw.” They don’t have the advantage of ancestors who were used to surviving in a primitive world.

Long Weekend succeeds as an offbeat horror film, and as a parable of how humanity’s indifference and wilful destruction of the natural world has consequences.

The region 1 version of the DVD is best for special features. It includes an audio commentary with the producer and director of photography, and an interview with John Hargreaves. Yet another film to have succumbed to the pointless remake mania, this original ranks a respectable 80% on the Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer. The 2008 version, alternatively known as Nature’s Grave, failed to make it above 0%.

longweekend2

 

About the author:

Dene Bebbington works part-time in IT but feels more at home writing horror fiction. He’s had short stories published in various anthologies (Dark Corners, Dark Light III, Behind Closed Doors, and Disrupted Worlds to name a few), three stories as podcasts at The Wicked Library, and is the author of the ebook novellas Zombie Revelations and Stonefall. He lives in Wiltshire, England, with his wife and a tank of greedy tropical fish.

For more info visit:

www.denebebbington.co.uk

dene

 

DAY SIX of The Dirty Dozen, 12 Days of X-mas: Flatline Photography

Hey there! It’s day 666… err… day 6 of our holiday celebration, and I’ve been wondering… why is it that some of us are drawn to darkness? Why is it that you, dear reader, are visiting a horror blog for an X-mas celebration you know darn well has nothing to do with X-mas? The answer is simple: Horror fans cannot get enough horror.

Ah, yes, lovers of the macabre. We come in all walks of life, and our friends and family don’t always get it, do they? They don’t quite see the beauty we see in something like horror photography, for instance. A gruesome art form, horror photography is one of my favorite things to view online. Like today’s guest, Flatline Photography. I adore their work. (Visit them at https://www.facebook.com/FlatlinePhotographyInc)

As for WHY horror photography is a beautiful thing to me, here are a few quotes:

“Art should offend people because art should challenge people.” -Eriq La Salle

“We make up horrors to help us cope with the real ones.” -Stephen King

“Art doesn’t have to be pretty. It has to be meaningful.” -Duane Hanson

flatline1flatline2flatline3flatline4flatline5flatline6

A huge thank you to our guest, Flatline Photography. (Visit them at https://www.facebook.com/FlatlinePhotographyInc)

DAY FOUR of The Dirty Dozen, 12 Days of X-mas: Still Life

Wow. We are already a third of the way through our 12 Days of X-mas celebration. Yup, yup, it is day 4. And I’ve got something way better than “four calling birds” to share with you. This short film is one of the most chilling YouTube horror movies I’ve seen. The video itself is pretty old by Internet standards and a tad blurry since it was uploaded a decade ago… but trust me, it’s worth your time.

I present for your viewing pleasure… Still Life

 

 

DAY THREE of The Dirty Dozen, 12 Days of X-mas: Adam Pixel Horrography

Welcome to day 3 of Dirty Little Horror’s 12 day celebration. What’s horror got to do with X-mas, you ask? Why all the fuss? I’ll tell you why: Because the holidays are stressful, and horror fans need the distraction!

Today, we celebrate dark photography with haunting images from Adam Pixel Horrography. Many thanks to Adam (whose page is linked below) and the beautiful models Ashen Falls and Donna Kennedy.

https://www.facebook.com/Adam-Pixel-Horrography-701421573282041

Adam Pixel Horrography - model Ashen FallsAdam Pixel Horrography - model Ashen Falls 2Adam Pixel Horrography - model Ashen Falls 3Adam Pixel Horrography - Donna KennedyAdam Pixel Horrography - Donna Kennedy 2Adam Pixel Horrography - Donna Kennedy 3

VISIT ADAM PIXEL HORROGRAPHY ON FACEBOOK:

https://www.facebook.com/Adam-Pixel-Horrography-701421573282041

Thanks for stopping by, and I promise – weird or not – I shall continue to fill your holiday season with blood and guts! See you tomorrow!

DAY TWO of Dirty Dozen, 12 Days of X-mas: La Cabina, a movie review by Dene Bebbington

DEADLY TELEPHONE BOXES

by: Dene Bebbington

A telephone box isn’t scary. Well, not unless you’ve seen the short surreal horror called La Cabina – translated to The Telephone Box in English. Dating back to 1972, this Spanish TV production by Antonio Mercero demonstrates perfectly that an innocuous fixture in the public sphere can become a source of terror. And the only monsters making an appearance in the film are human.

Horror writer Stephen King once likened reading a novel to having a long and satisfying affair. He contrasted that with a short story being like a quick kiss in the dark from a stranger. This metaphor can be carried over to films. La Cabina at a mere 35 minutes long leaves a lasting, and disturbing, impression because of its short and surreal nature. Like any good short horror story it provides no explanations for the situation that the victim finds himself in.

lacabina4

Only read on if you’re prepared for spoilers!

The story begins with four workmen in a phone company truck arriving at a plaza surrounded by apartment buildings. They unload a red telephone box from the back of the truck and install it in the middle of the plaza and leave its door ajar. A human venus fly trap has been set.

Shortly afterwards a middle aged suited man sees his son off to school and then decides to go into the telephone box to make a call. He soon finds that the phone is out of order, but while trying it the door has closed behind him. Initially puzzled that the door won’t open he then becomes agitated and tries to force it open, to no avail. He doesn’t have to wait long before two men walking by on their way to work spot his predicament and fruitlessly try to pull the door open. Unfortunately they can’t stick around and have to leave. More people have noticed what’s going on and a crowd starts to gather – obviously this is entertainment in a town where nothing much normally happens.

lacabina1

The mood of the film so far is fairly lighthearted, though it’s easy to feel sympathy for the man whose discomfort and embarrassment has become palpable now he’s also an object of curiosity and amusement. The next few minutes are played mainly for laughs as several people, including a couple of policemen, try to pull the phone box door open only to fail and fall over backward with the door handle in their hands. The crowd itself becomes a source of curiosity too. There’s a tall man stealing cakes from a tray a boy holds on his head; an old woman is invited to sit on a chair a man was taking somewhere; a couple of workmen stand around with a big mirror; and children taunt the trapped man.

Symbolism and homages quickly emerge. For instance, we notice that two of the onlookers are women sat chatting and knitting. This is presumably a reference to Madame Defarge who sits knitting while people go their deaths in Charles Dickens’ novel A Tale of Two Cities.

Eventually a fire truck arrives and the firemen decide to break the glass of the phone box. One of them gets on top of the box and is just about to smash the glass with a sledgehammer when the phone company truck comes back, its horn beeping for attention.

The phone company workmen proceed to load the phone box onto their truck. It’s at this point that the man inside realises that something is more than a little amiss with the situation. Despite his obvious panic and gestures to the workmen to get him out, the crowd wave him off with cries of “Good luck”. Having been so close to escape his fate is getting even more puzzling.

Like some kind of peculiar mobile freak show the truck drives through the town with the trapped man eliciting jokes by passers by and lots of friendly waves. Much to his chagrin, people continually misunderstand his gestures for help. On the way out of town they come to a halt in traffic and by the side of the road is a funeral party standing around a glass casket containing a corpse on display. This is an unsubtle way of signalling the man’s own fate. A little later while stopped at traffic lights another phone company truck pulls up alongside and on it is an identical phone box with a man stuck inside it. Looks of empathy and questioning pass between the two men before the other truck pulls away. Our man then becomes even more panicked and desperately tries to get the workmen’s attention to let him out. This is the first indication that he’s caught up in more than just an unlucky accident.

lacabina5

A neat touch is when we see a man briefly struggling to get out of a phone box by the side of the road. But in his case the door soon gives way, and he walks away little knowing what may have otherwise happened to him.

So now we know there’s a concerted effort to capture people. For what purpose we can only guess at, and will never find out. Around this time the soundtrack becomes portentous with low register rhythms. Driving out of the town there’s one final and meaningful encounter with other people. When the truck has to stop again some circus dwarves near the road look on, and they are the only ones to simply look and not laugh or wave. In return the man earnestly looks back at them. Maybe the dwarves who are used to being stared at because of their appearance identify with the man’s situation in which he’s an object of curiosity and fun. Then blatant symbolism enters when the camera focuses on a ship in a bottle held by one of the dwarves.

The journey continues on winding mountain roads, first up and then down. For no obvious a helicopter joins in following the truck from the air. Eventually the final destination gets closer as a tunnel into the mountainside is reached. The helicopter lands just outside and the pilot gets out to wave at the man as he disappears into the tunnel.

As the truck continues into an underground complex the soundtrack changes to sinister chanting in Latin somewhat like that used in The Omen. They pass men cleaning out phone boxes, and also a truck going the other way full of empty phone boxes. By this time the man is more anguished, but despite frantically banging on the glass he’s continually ignored. At this point I started to wonder, are the four workmen a metaphor for the four horsemen of the apocalypse, or is it just coincidence because four are needed to load and unload the phone box?

Soon after, the truck yields its unlikely cargo to an overhead crane that takes it away and passes it to a series of conveyor belts. The man’s bizarre fate is then made clear when he’s taken past corpses in telephone boxes identical to his own.

The man’s phone box comes to a halt next to one containing the other victim he saw earlier. That man has strangled himself with the phone cord rather than endure a lingering death.

lacabina3

It’s all over for the man. He now knows it yet still makes a last effort of banging on the glass hoping to be let out. Desperately aware that he’s doomed the final shot of him is slowly sliding down the glass of his coffin in despair and resignation. What started out as an ordinary day for an ordinary man has turned into the kind of thing that nightmares are made of.

Turning full circle the film ends at the plaza where a shiny new telephone box is installed and its door left open. We are left wondering how long it’ll be until some other hapless person attempts to make a call.

I first saw this film on TV late at night over 30 years ago and it’s been stuck vividly in my memory ever since. It’s truly terrifying, playing to archetypal fears like people ignoring your pleas for help and being buried alive. The trapped man is brilliantly played by Jose Luis Lopez Vazquez, a Spanish actor with a substantial list of acting credits to his name.

The film can be watched here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKkfGG9q32c

 

lacabina2

 

About the author:

Dene Bebbington works part-time in IT but feels more at home writing horror fiction. He’s had short stories published in various anthologies (Dark Corners, Dark Light III, Behind Closed Doors, and Disrupted Worlds to name a few), three stories as podcasts at The Wicked Library, and is the author of the ebook novellas Zombie Revelations and Stonefall. He lives in Wiltshire, England, with his wife and a tank of greedy tropical fish.

For more info visit:

www.denebebbington.co.uk

dene

 

 

 

 

Welcome to DirtyLittleHorror.com!

horror4

Welcome to the ribbon cutting ceremony at DirtyLittleHorror.com! Shall we cut the ribbon Leatherface-style with a rusty chainsaw or just Freddy Krueger it to pieces? Aw, heck, hand me the machete and we’ll go full-on Jason in honor of today’s date, Friday the 13th.

So… what exactly IS this blog? Simple answer: A place for all things horror. My only goal is to entertain. There is SO MUCH more I plan to do with this website, but I figured today is a fitting release date, so why wait?

My first post will be a list of my favorite online horror films. These short movies are awesome because they are FREE to stream online, they don’t take much time to watch, and they are extremely entertaining! I have listed my Top Ten in random order. I love them all equally. Why compete?

1: THE SMILING MAN – Proving that horror needs no words.

2: LIGHTS OUT – Just… oh my god.

3: SUCK-A-BLOOD – a morbid nursery rhyme

4: NIGHT OF THE LITTLE DEAD – If you’re a Bill Moseley fan and you missed this little gem, watch immediately!

5: LITTLE REAPER- Even Death has trouble raising his teen in this hilarious horror comedy.

6: UNLUCKY GIRL – zooooooombies

7: ALEXIA – when your girl stalks you on social media

8: HORRIFIC – gore comedy at its finest

9: DON’T MOVE – really, don’t move!!

10: MOTHER DIED – an engrossing end of the world tale

So that’s it! My first post! Lots more to come. Please follow!

dlh

%d bloggers like this: