Interview with Kenneth W. Cain

Hello again, my wicked readers. The kiddos have gone back to school, so I’m going Back To Scares. 

I was a ghost

who never did post.

I’ll soon be the host

who thrills you most.

Haha. Okay, that was an awful poem. Suffice it to say, I am breathing some much-needed life (and DEATH) back into this blog.

On today’s agenda, an amazing interview with author Kenneth W. Cain:

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What draws you to dark fiction?

I was raised to be a fearful man, which has hindered my enjoyment of life. Somewhere in my teens I started rebelling against that fear, embracing my fears, rationalizing them. It was and still is very much a process. But, I suppose that confrontation sparked my interest in the unknown, as I’ve always had this need to expose the darkness. To shine a light on it in hopes of uncovering the unknown. There’s so much we don’t understand about ourselves, about this world, the deep ocean and darkest forest, space and beyond. It can make one feel very small and insignificant. That’s my draw.

 

Embers, your latest book of short stories, has received some awesome reviews. How many stories are included in the pages of Embers, and what inspired you to put this collection together?

There are 25 stories in Embers. That means it’s chock full of fun, and that’s always what I aim for, to make sure there’s something for everyone. And that’s part of the joy, seeing what stories jive with this person and that, what the takeaway is. For me, it’s a journey, all of this writing business. It’s the same with a collection. It’s all about laying bricks to a path that leads through a horrific garden. Each step has a precise space, that hopefully allows the reader to journey along with me. And if I’m successful in creating this walkway, maybe they see through my eyes, if only for a brief moment. That’s the fun of it.

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You have written both short and long fiction. Does your process differ for each?

Well, I stumbled into this business in 2010 with These Trespasses, which actually began as a blog series believe it or not. At that point, I was far from finding any sort of stride, and I think the story suffered because of it. Same with some of my other earlier work, as I’d been away from this all too long, and had not progressed at all, and needed to rediscover myself. So I suppose it was originally more of a hobby for me then, sorry to say.

At some point more recently, I started falling in love with the written word again. Those who have spoken with me in person or on the phone know of my desire to learn more of the craft. It’s something that excites me, and I think that’s starting to bleed into my writing the correct way (pun intended). So there’s a process to my writing now, that more or less is me getting the story out, no matter how big or small, and refining it over edits for layering and tension and emotion, characterization and all.

To answer your question more specifically, it’s more about the story and less about the process. My characters lead me through, and only they know when their story has been fully told. I give them that control, give into the fiction. That’s actually helped me to a large degree I think, as I’m seeing through their eyes with more clarity these days.

 

Which part of writing is your favorite: outlining a plot, developing characters, crafting a setting, or writing dialogue?

Well, I’m a panser, so it wouldn’t be outlining. I’ve tried time and time again with no success. As for the rest, I suppose it’s more of a combination of those three. Dialogue is part of the characterization. Also, setting is a bit like a character in that we need to breathe life into it. There’s a look and feel to everything, a sound or sounds, and smells. It’s about hitting the senses to best create a painting of a real life scene with moving parts and feeling. When you hit it, with all the right beats, you know it, and that creation is a beautiful thing.

 

Which part/s do you struggle with?

Well that’s a tough question. I’d say I struggle with it all because I’m never really satisfied. At times, I’ll revisit something I’ve written in the past and rue over my mistakes. And yes, there’s always mistakes. Not necessarily in the sense of grammar or misspelling, but in layering and character flaws and dialogue, voice. Such has been the case as I dive back into my trilogy and revisit my earliest efforts. But that’s also been a rewarding process. This business is all about growth for me, and that in itself is an endless study.

 

Are you involved with any creative projects, aside from writing?

Creative is such a broad word, but yes. Many in fact. I perform much of the formatting and graphic design tasks for The Lovecraft eZine and others upon request. I’ve also been editing quite a bit lately, too. Occasionally, I’ll paint and/or draw. Art was one of my first passions. My reef tanks are also creative in a way, I suppose.

 

If you could sit and talk with any three authors, living or deceased, who would they be?

That’s a tough question, as there are so many whose minds I’d like to pick. Currently, though, I guess that would be Joe Hill, Shirley Jackson, and Richard Matheson.

 

What are your hobbies and interests when you’re not writing?

Well, my family is my biggest interest. I enjoy spending time with them, whatever we’re doing. But there’s also my reef tank and growing corals. Painting, riding my bike, going to the gym, baseball (I coach my son’s teams), the beach. Actually, a good friend enlightened me to see the beauty in anything long ago, and ever since, I tend to take interest in most anything, which isn’t always easy as you could imagine.

 

Are there any genres you’d like to attempt but haven’t tried yet?

I don’t read a lot of science fiction. I used to, so I’m not opposed to it, but I’m not always one who gravitates to what some classify as “hard” science fiction. Again, it’s not that I don’t like it, just that I don’t always prefer it. Maybe (occasionally) something gets lost in all that overly technical jargon and pulls me out of the story, I’m not certain. Whatever the case, I’d like to revisit that shelf (so to say).

 

What can we expect to see from Kenneth W. Cain in the near future?

Right now, I’m rewriting my trilogy. I’m not certain what I’ll do with it afterword, whether I’ll try to find another publisher or self publish the series, but I do need to put in the work. I’m also working on a young adult horror novella and two new novels among other shorter projects, and possibly a new collection. Editing wise, I’m doing some work for a small press right now, but soon (October 1st) I’ll be editing volume 5 of Crystal Lake Publishing’s Tales From The Lake series. That’s a project I’m really looking forward to.

 

Where can we find you on the web?

Most of my links to connect can be found here: https://kennethwcain.com/contact

 

 

Wow, what a fantastic interview. Thank you so much, Kenneth W. Cain!!!

The Dirty Dozen: 12 Most Memorable Black Horror Movie Characters

I’ve been busy all summer long and never got a chance to post, but it’s Back To School time for the kiddos, and in honor of that, I’m doing a Back To Scares blogging event!

On today’s agenda: The Dirty Dozen: 12 Most Memorable Black Horror Movie Characters

Horror cinema would benefit from more black characters. We don’t see it enough. The following is my list of the most MEMORABLE black horror movie characters. Not all are lead characters (some had very little screen time but stole the show). This isn’t about Best Acted Roles or even Best Characters. These are the most memorable… because there is just something about the character that makes us connect with them, remember them…

Some of you will argue genre:  “Scary Movie is a comedy” and “Seven is a crime thriller.” Look, just sit back and let me entertain you, okay?

There’s an Honorable Mentions section at the bottom. I’ll let you in on a little secret: This is my way of keeping the “Dirty Dozen” theme without actually narrowing it down to 12! So tough! And you know what? There’s actually more in the Honorable Mentions section than on the list! LOL.

So here we go….

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Fool – People Under The Stairs

When young Fool (Brandon Adams) breaks into the home of his family’s greedy and uncaring landlords, he discovers a disturbing scenario where incestuous adults have mutilated a number of boys and kept them imprisoned under their stairs.

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Peter Washington – Dawn of the Dead

Peter Washington is a member of Philadelphia’s SWAT when the walking dead crisis has reached critical condition. He saves the life of a fellow SWAT member of another squad, and he is offered a ride out of Philly and so joins the party that ends up at the notorious Monroeville Hyper-Mall. And that’s only where the drama begins!

 

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Jeryline – Demon Knight

Demon Knight is a feature-length film presented by the HBO series Tales from the Crypt, and features scenes with the Crypt Keeper, but what really drives the plot forward is the strong and beautiful character Jeryline, played by Jada Pinkett Smith. A must-see, if you haven’t.

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Detective Lt. William Somerset – Seven

What more do I need to say? Morgan Freeman is amazing in every role he plays, but the sheer intensity of the plot in Seven kicks his acting up another notch. This is such an engrossing film, and – like I said in my intro – you can argue that Seven is a “crime-thriller” all you want. This movie scared the shit out of me. I say horror!

 

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Lance Shroeder – House on Haunted Hill 1999

A millionaire with theatrical tendencies invites a number of people to stay in a vast creepy building that used to be an insane asylum. Lance Shroeder, played by Taye Diggs, is one of the unfortunate crew to accept this invitation. He’s so darn likeable, guys, you just have to root for him the whole time. Gotta love this character.

 

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Maximillian – Vampire in Brooklyn

Maximillian is the only survivor from a race of vampires on a Caribbean Island, and he must find a mate to keep the bloodline from ending. Horror comedy at its finest. Directed by Wes Craven and starring Eddie Murphy, this is definitely a memorable character.

 

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Sara Tidwell – Bag of Bones

I know a lot of people did not enjoy the film adaptation of Stephen King’s 1998 novel Bag of Bones. It was a two-part miniseries, which appeared on regular TV.  Maybe I’m lucky I hadn’t read the book, because I really enjoyed it. Sara Tidwell is a vivacious singer and a lost soul who does not get much screen time, but she stuck in my mind long after the credits rolled. Actress Anika Noni Rose was hauntingly gorgeous in this role.

 

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Candyman

I love Tony Todd, and you’ll see him twice more in the Honorable Mentions. His portrayal of Candyman is horrifying, with a genuinely creepy voice that invades your mind like the sweetest of poisons. For real. You’ll almost want to call upon the Candyman yourself, though you know it’s a bad idea. There’s something so alluring and so revolting at the same time about this character…. malicious to the core but with such a sad backstory.

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Russell Franklin – Deep Blue Sea

On an island research facility, a scientist is harvesting the brain tissue of DNA-altered sharks as a possible cure for Alzheimer’s disease. When the facility’s backers send executive Russell Franklin (Samuel L. Jackson) to investigate the experiments, a routine procedure goes awry and sharks start attacking the researchers. As you can imagine, Russell snaps and screams, “Enough is enough! I have had it with these motherfuckin’ sharks on this motherfuckin’ island!” Oh wait… nevermind, nevermind. That was a different movie… 🙂 snakes

 

 

 

 

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Brenda Meeks – Scary Movie 1, 2, 3, and 4

Brenda Meeks cracks me up. She’s the only character who kept me coming back to the Scary Movie sequels. Watching her fight Samara from The Ring in #3 had me rolling, some of her one-liners in #4 were even funnier, and really… she had me from the start in #1. Brenda Meeks is lively and sweet, and she is anything but “meek” if you light her fuse.

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Chris Washington – Get Out

Chris Washington is a young photographer in an interracial relationship, and when it comes time to meet his girlfriend’s family, he is hesitant. He worries that her parents won’t accept him. He’s in love, so he agrees to the trip anyway, and while staying at his girlfriend’s family home, he discovers things are much worse than he feared. The character of Chris played on the heartstrings of audiences worldwide. We really felt for him.

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Andre – Dawn of the Dead 2004

From the moment we meet Andre, we understand he has a lot to protect. His girlfriend’s belly is swollen, and he’s nervous to protect the child inside. That’s easier said than done in a post-apocalyptic world full of zombies and untrustworthy humans, but he is determined. There’s one scene in particular that is unforgettable.

 

Honorable Mentions:

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The Dirty Dozen: Top 12 Weirdest and Creepiest Horror Movie Dances

“You’ve gotta dance like there’s nobody watching,
Love like you’ll never be hurt,
Sing like there’s nobody listening,
And live like it’s heaven on earth.” – William W. Purkey

“We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once.” -Friedrich Nietzsche

“Do a loony-goony dance
‘Cross the kitchen floor,
Put something silly in the world
That ain’t been there before.” – Shel Silverstein

Dancing. It makes us human. Whether we do it in front of others or bust a move in private when we hear our favorite song,  most of us have enjoyed a little dancing. But in horror movies, dancing takes on a whole new element. It’s either absurdly out-of-place,  insanely cheesy, eerily seductive, or downright creepy.

I offer you my Top Twelve Weirdest and Creepiest Horror Movie Dances. They are all listed here for different reasons… but all of them possess a certain WTF factor. Like seriously…. WTF?

 

Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter – Total Spaz Dance

Okay, we all know this wasn’t the final chapter. But hopefully it was the final chapter in Crispin Glover’s dancing efforts. What is happening here?!?!?!

 

Insidious – Tiptoe Through The Tulips

Hey, even the ghosts of creepy little dead boys like to dance. Don’t hate.

 

Freddy’s Revenge – Jesse Cleans His Room

Jesse just moved into a new house and his parents are nagging him to get his room straightened up. So he vents his frustration in this awesome and very uncomfortable dance! Hahaha.

 

Dead & Breakfast –  Zombie Line Dance

I don’t even… uhhh…. I don’t even know what to say about this one. I’m so confused. Lol.

 

Carrie – Spinning

I have to mention the dance from the original Carrie because I refuse to believe I’m the only person in the world who can’t watch this scene without getting queasy. I mean… the spinning. The spinning is too much. *gag*

 

Sleepwalkers – Getting The Job Done

Sticking with Stephen King, here’s a great scene from Sleepwalkers. Man, oh man, I wish I could have this much fun at work.

 

Night of the Demons – There’s Something Different About Angela

Is it just me, or does this chick make demonic possession look HAWT?

 

Evil Dead 2 – Dance of the Headless Lover

Poor Ash. The dead just never seem to stay dead for him.

 

Scout’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse – Groovy Janitor

Sadly, I couldn’t find a high-quality clip of Blake Anderson (from Comedy Central’s Workaholics) dancing his way toward doom in Scout’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse. But at least someone out there has uploaded something because, man, it’s so darn funny.

 

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning – Everyone’s A Critic

Hey, Jason, Violet’s dancing wasn’t that bad. It was actually sorta cute. You didn’t have to KILL her!! Sheesh!

 

Troll 2 – Holly Gets Down

Troll 2 was released in 1990, which meant the 80s were over. But as you can see from this clip, the 80s were still very much alive. And you have to admit, she’s got some pretty good moves.

 

Return of the Living Dead – Trash’s Strip Tease

Again, I apologize for the quality. It’s hard to find this video, I guess because of the adult content. But I could never leave out the nude graveyard dance from Return of the Living Dead.

 

So there you have it. My Top Twelve.

Horror is full of strange and wonderful dancing, so feel free to comment with your favorites. Thanks for reading.

 

 

 

 

WIHM Interview – Kelly Evans

It’s been a great Women in Horror Month, and there’s still time for one more interview. Let’s get to know author Kelly Evans.

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How long have you been writing?

Since I was a kid. Especially horror. I wrote a series of short horror stories in high school last period English class, left them in my friend’s locker and she’d read them to her morning physics class the next day. I had a bit of a following apparently.

What draws you to horror?

I love being scared. Everyone does, don’t they? But I love figuring out what, exactly, will scare people. And then finding the words to express that horror.

Do you write any other genres?

I also write historical fiction. I’m currently working on a 3 book series about the queens of Anglo Saxon England, the first of which came out last year. I’m also shortly releasing a historical horror novel, set during the Black Death.

Is there a genre you’d like to attempt but haven’t?

I enjoy humour, but I’m not sure I could write an entire novel. I DO write satirical historical articles though.

Do you think women horror authors have a hard time getting acknowledged?

Yes, absolutely. Horror, especially the more graphic stuff, has always been aggressive and fearful, something associated with men. But women can be aggressive, believe me. We can also go softly softly, creeping into your subconscious and scaring the pants off you before you know we’re even there.

What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever written and why?

I had to write a novel for a master’s in writing I was doing. *I* enjoyed the story but my tutor hated it, just didn’t understand what I was trying to do. THAT was tough; I lost interest in the book and never finished it.

Who are some amazing female authors (from any genre, any style, any time-period)?

I’m a big fan of medieval female authors, it’s nice to get the perspective of a group of people who have often been swept aside in favour of their male counterparts. Julian of Norwich, Margery Kemp, the Paston Letters, Hildegarde of Bingen, all worth taking a peek at.

Besides writing, what brings a smile to your face?

Clever humour. My cats. And, mainly, my husband!

Did you have a favorite book as a child?

I adored The Cat in the Mirror by Mary Stolz, about ancient Egypt. Also No Flying in the House by Betty Brock, and of course A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. All made a huge impression on me.

Here’s a tough one: What’s your favorite color?

Forest green.

What are you working on now, and where do you see yourself in the future?

I’m getting my historic horror ready for release, then continue with the second in my Anglo Saxon women series. I also write satirical medieval articles for my website each month, which are a LOT of fun. I’m retiring soon and will be writing full time, historical fiction and some more horror!

Where can we find you on the web?

website: http://www.kellyaevans.com

Twitter: @Chaucerbabe

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/kellyevansauthor/

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Thanks for your support this WiHM!

Remember, there are always female horror writers out there hungry for more readers, all twelve months of the year!

Horror Meme Hilarity

From time to time here at Dirty Little Horror, I like to post funny pics to give my fellow horror fans a giggle. Enjoy…

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WIHM Interview – Sheri Williams

It’s still Women in Horror month, so please take a few minutes and get to know author Sheri Williams. I already knew she is a fun, amazing person and a talented writer, but there were a few things I didn’t know. Let’s find out…

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How long have you been writing?

Um….since second grade? No. I really started writing about 4 years ago.

What draws you to horror?

I like to kill people. Sounds horrible, but it’s true. I’m a super optimistic person and I try to be happy, so the anger has to go somewhere. Every annoying parent at school drop off…..they all die horribly in my stories.

Do you write any other genres?

Oh yeah. Romance. Fantasy. And middle grade under a pen name 😁

Is there a genre you’d like to attempt but haven’t?

Ummm. I’ve sorta tried a bunch, in different variations. I really love Gothic stuff so would love to play around with that more.

Do you think women horror authors have a hard time getting acknowledged?

Definitely.  It just doesn’t seem to be as recognized.  Although, the real fans are rabid!

What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever written and why?

My first book. Fairy tale romance. It’s still the book I’m most proud of.

Who are some amazing female authors (from any genre, any style, any time-period)?

Misti Murphy, she’s my wifey. She writes dead sexy contemporary romance. I’m a huge P. Mattern fan. Quenby Olsen writes fantastic books. Huge fan. Can’t forget Lindsey Goddard, that chick is awesome. And then there’s Anne Rice and Anne McCaffrey….my heroes.

Besides writing, what brings a smile to your face?

My daughters. My hubs. Books. Doctor Who. Geeky stuff in general. And donuts.

Did you have a favorite book as a child?

Alice in Wonderland.  Still my favorite to this day.

Here’s a tough one: What’s your favorite color?

Blue, color of my hair and the Tardis.

What are you working on now, and where do you see yourself in the future?

A middle grade alternative history, magical realism. And a paranormal (occult) thriller with a horror aspect.

Where can we find you on the web?

Everywhere.

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www.thesheriwilliams.com

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WIHM Interview – L Bachman

Today we chat with L Bachman – artist, author, and woman in horror. She makes wicked cool book covers in addition to penning her own tales. Let’s find out more…

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How long have you been writing?

I have indeed! I’ve been writing since I was young, but it was only a few years ago that I began taking it seriously after forcing myself to throw caution to the wind and take the leap.

What draws you to horror?

I struggled with the genre I was writing in. I couldn’t understand genres; still have trouble from time to time honestly. The way I thought was if it’s not something that frightens me, it probably wasn’t horror, never considering that some people may be frightened by the things I wasn’t frightened by. I felt perhaps my writing wasn’t ‘scary enough’ when I read it back so it mustn’t be horror.

After I understood what I was creating, it made sense to me like someone shining a light in the dark room of my understanding of genres. I enjoy writing horror more now that I understand it. Horror, scaring others, isn’t what I intend when I write, my focus is just getting the story out before I implode, but there is appreciation in why I do what I do for at least me.

Facing fears can be cathartic, relieving even, but until the story ends, the thrill and intensity taps into something deeply rooted in all beings. That is why I’m drawn to it, facing down ‘bad guys’ or ‘bad situations’ and overcoming the fight or flight that we all deal with when dealing with the adrenaline rush we can get when reading.

Do you write any other genres?

At this moment, dark fantasy is the only one that any of my work can fall into.

 

 

Is there a genre you’d like to attempt but haven’t?

I’m working on some branching out stories from horror and dark fantasy, not a complete genre hopping, but casting out a twig to touch into those pools.

Do you think women horror authors have a hard time getting acknowledged?

I don’t think as much so now, but I can see how the history of women in horror was. There was a time when it was difficult to gain respect, for any woman writer. Many historic women writers took pen names that were either neutral or sounded more masculine.

What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever written and why?

The Painting of Martel was difficult; originally it was included in an anthology with a theme of killer clowns. I had never thought I’d write a story involving this theme and so it came hard to me, but I met my deadline. It’s been a year since it was in that anthology and after taking it, revamping it a bit, and working it into something more than it was I can say confidently that it will find a shelf space in being published on its own. May 1st, 2017 is when it goes live. Right now it’s for pre-order.

Who are some amazing female authors (from any genre, any style, any time-period)?

Personally, I find Mary Shelly and Anne Rice to be amazing writers.

Besides writing, what brings a smile to your face?

My family; my son makes me very happy, he’s so smart, and I could gush over my pride of all that he has accomplished. Family makes me truly happy beyond writing.

Did you have a favorite book as a child?

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austin.

Here’s a tough one: What’s your favorite color?

Black.

What are you working on now, and where do you see yourself in the future?

Right now I’m working on several things at once. I’m writing The Burning Man, Mercy, and Necessary Evil. That’s the three I’m working on seriously, but I always have something in the works just put on simmer on the back burner.

Where can we find you on the web?

Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/writerbachman

Twitter:
https://twitter.com/authorlbachman

Facebook Fanclub:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/bachmanblasphemer

Website for Writing:
http://lbachman.wixsite.com/lbachman

Website for Design:
http://lbachman.wixsite.com/bachmandesigns

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Women in Horror Month = free fiction!

Hello, horror buddies. Happy Women in Horror Month.

Being as I am a woman in horror, I’ll be posting this month about some awesome females I know. But before we get to that, I want to make everyone aware of all the free fiction floating around this month. Yes, FREE. The magic word.

First and foremost, not because it is my book, but because the promotion ends soon… I want to spread the word that my novella, Ashes of Another Life, is currently FREE on Kindle until the end of the day on Feb 3rd. Please, go snag a copy if you’re a Kindle reader! Search “Ashes of Another Life” on Amazon or click here:  https://www.amazon.com/Ashes-Another-Life-Lindsey-Goddard-ebook/dp/B01KDD4ZCC/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1486043611&sr=8-1

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There are lots of book giveaways this month, as women of horror plug away trying to get their names out there. Dozens of free books just waiting to be downloaded by YOU. A good place to find them is here: http://angelinetrevena.co.uk/free-horror-books

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And last but certainly not least, some scary ladies got together and wrote 100 word flash horror stories. You can find those linked below and also a video about the ladies involved.

100 word flash stories: https://kellyaevans.com/women-in-horror

 
Thanks for reading. In the famous words of Terminator: I’ll be back.

The Dead of Winter

Here it is again. Winter. I’ll be honest, I’m not a fan. Where others see beauty in a fluffy white glazing of snow, I see only three months of hibernation. Because I hate the stuff.

It’s no mystery why my mind tends to wander to the grim topic of death. I’m in the dead of Winter here in Missouri, after all. I’ve been thinking about the dead – more specifically, how different cultures remember the dead – and decided to share what I know.

Winter takes my mind to dark places. Perhaps its icy clutches haunt me…

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Over the years, humans have honored their dead in peculiar and sometimes macabre ways.

Ever heard of post-mortem photography? Straight from Wikipedia: “Post-mortem photography (also known as memorial portraiture or a mourning portrait) is the practice of photographing the recently deceased. These photographs of deceased loved ones were a normal part of American and European culture in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Commissioned by grieving families, postmortem photographs not only helped in grieving, but often represented the only visual remembrance of the deceased and were among a family’s most precious possessions.”

No disrespect intended, but having grown up in a different century, some of these photos seem a bit disturbing now…

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Look closely. The youngest child on the far left is deceased, propped up with a wooden stand. You can see the discomfort and sadness in her brother’s face.

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The story goes that the photographer drew pupils on her closed eyelids to make her more life-like.

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Sometimes even a man’s best friend wanted to say goodbye.

Then there’s the following photograph, which has become somewhat of an urban legend, because no one can prove or disprove the story behind it. People say the reason all the children seem to be frowning, or even grimacing, is that they are being forced to pose with a classmate who died the day before.

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They say the deceased student was propped up with a wooden board and her head was tied to the board by means of a head scarf. Do you see her? Look closer…

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Urban legend or not, that’s pretty creepy.

And then there are cultures like the Toraja people of Indonesia who keep their post-mortem loved ones around for weeks, months, or even years after death, until enough money is raised for a fitting and proper funeral. During this time, the deceased relative is symbolically fed, dressed, cared for and taken out, and is very much a part of their family’s lives.

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But if you think post-mortem photography and mummification is strange, the thought of drinking from a human skull might push you over the edge, right? That’s probably why the Aghori tribe of India are considered taboo among their neighboring communities. They ritualistically smear themselves with cremated ashes, consume human flesh, and drink from skulls to become closer to the spiritual world of the dead.

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To each his own, but that’s not quite my cup of tea.

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So there you have it. THIS is what Winter does to me, people. The dead of Winter… when the deceased whisper to us on the icy breeze, telling us to cherish our precious days, albeit bitterly cold. Winter will pass, just as humans pass, and the world will continue to spin.

Well, as usual, this has been a bit of uplifting cheer from your admin here at Dirty Little Horror. Happy Winter, folks.

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The Dirty Dozen – Top Twelve BLOODY Scenes

I believe Dirty Little Horror is a special blog. We venture where others dare not tread. Yet lately, I’ve been slow to post. I love horror, of course, but sometimes I can’t think of anything to SAY about my beloved genre in order to keep you all amused. 🙂

So I sat down and asked myself, “What are some of my favorite horror movie scenes, and why?” I realized something. I have a fascination with fake blood. That runny red stuff can make or break a scene for me. I’m not just talking gore or clever ways to die. I’m talking about BLOOD, and lots of it. Picture the elevator doors in The Shining – a crimson cascade rushing down the hall. Picture that bucket tipping over on poor Carrie White, covering her from head to toe as she trembles in her homemade prom dress. These scenes are a staple of horror culture.

 

Here are twelve more. I’ve put these BLOODY scenes in no particular order, but I did save the bloodiest for last. I give to you…

 

THE DIRTY DOZEN – TOP TWELVE BLOODY SCENES

 

Movie: Blade (1998)

Scene: Bloodbath at the rave

 

Movie: The Descent (2005)

Scene: Crimson Pool

 

Movie: Maniac (1980)

Scene: Head shot

 

 

Movie: High Tension (2003)

Scene: Saw through the windshield

 

 

Movie: Evil Dead 2 (1987)

Scene: Pulled into the cellar

 

Movie: Inside (2007)

Scene: Surgery on the staircase

 

 

Movie: Piranha (2010)

Scene: Bloody beach party

 

Movie: Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

Scene: Death bed

 

Movie: Mirrors (2008)

Scene: Jaw rip

 

Movie: Cabin in the Woods (2011)

Scene: When all the monsters come to play

 

 

Movie: Dead Alive (1982)

Scene: Nice mowing you

 

Movie: Evil Dead (2013)

Scene: Rainin’ blood

 

As always, thanks SO MUCH for visiting the site. Feel free to comment with YOUR favorite bloody scenes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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